Reading List 2021

Monday, 16 August 2021

Mundane Monday - Corn on the Cob - August 16, 2021

 We had our first corn on the cob the other day. It was delicious! I bought it from a local stand, just down the road. They were selling 15 for $5.00, but I didn't want 15, so I bought 7 for $2.50. It was paid for using the honour system, an affixed box with a slot in it. 

Corn on the cob is a definite childhood memory. My mother used to fill freezer bags of the stuff, cut off with a sharp knife after the cobs had been boiled in a big pot on the stove. As a child, I used to watch this happen, and would eat the sections of corn that stayed together in a rectangular piece, thinking they tasted better that way. 

I always knew that there were two types of corn. The corn that my uncle grew in his fields to feed his dairy herd, and sweet corn, that was grown under the hydro tower farther into the field in the hopes that the raccoons wouldn't find it. I was shocked to find out that "city" people didn't know the difference and once knew of someone who questioned why corn (as in, the ears of corn you would buy at the side of the road or at the grocery store at this time of year)  was so expensive when there was so much of it growing in the fields. 

We discovered, during supper, that we all ate our corn in different ways. We then joked that it could be one of those ridiculous "news" articles: "How you eat your corn could determine your success in life", or some such headline. 

Here were our methods:


#1. Start at one end and eat a width of several kernels, all the way around the cob, then move down and repeat, eating another width all the way around the cob...  Note, the use of two corn holders.



#2. Start at one end and eat a row of kernels all the way down the length of the cob. Then start back at the end and move onto another row of kernels, eating lengthwise down the cob (Note, it isn't just one kernel wide, but could be two or three). As well, only one corn holder at the large end.



#3. Similar to the second method, eating down the length of the cob, but far less precise, with random kernels left here and there and some also on the chin / face of the consumer. No corn holders used. Chickens enjoy this type of eater the best, as they benefit from the leftover bits. 



#4. The cutting off method is the fourth method. This type of consumer uses a good sharp knife and slices the kernels off, then eats the pile of corn from his or her plate. No corn holders required. 


As well, I know there are all sorts of methods for cooking corn on the cob. Mine is the old fashioned, standard one: husk corn and put husk and as much "silk" as you can get off in the compost pile. Have large pot of boiling water ready (no sugar added to the water), boil vigorously for about five minutes or so, take out of pot using tongs and eat immediately with butter or margarine and salt.


Please chime in. Do you use one of the eating methods above? Do you enjoy corn on the cob? Did you not know there are different varieties of corn, used for different purposes? Do you cook your corn a different way? Do you offer up toothpicks after the meal so everyone can get rid of all the corn stuck between their teeth? Ha ha.  

36 comments:

  1. It is just not a popular dish here in the UK - I think most of us tend to buy our corn in tins.

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  2. I love corn on the cob. For some reason it tastes so much better than corn in a can or frozen or even 'cut off the cob'. Even the cob is sweet after you've eaten the corn off... And I do prefer the mixed white and yellow cobs. As for how I eat it, I'm not sure. Think we just boil it for a bit, then add butter and salt, and start eating - probably straight across?

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  3. Sweet corn right now by us is so delish. I love it on the cob. Happy New Week. xoxo

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  4. Oh definitely a number three. I eat down and around and end up with a sticky happy face. Oh I'm so so envious. Corn should have been on sale at the market a few weeks ago. Nothing. Absoltuely nothing. Has it been a bad year for corn or will we see it soon. Sweet corn is a newish thing for greeks. They used to just eat it grilled from a little bbq seller on the pavement on warm summer nights. Theyve finally learned how scrumptious a plain boiled cob can be . Darn it.
    By the way I cook mine just like you. Doesnt matter how hot it is, butter, salt and then the toothpicks! Gorgeous

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  5. Our climate is not good enough for growing sweet corn for the cattle although we did try one year and failed. It is hit and miss with the weather. I do know the difference between cattle fodder sweet corn and sweet corn for us to eat. I am a number three, like Linda, and what I buy is imported from Southern Europe and I like loads of butter. I did have some fancy corn holders but no longer use them.

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  6. I remember when the sweet corn was ripe that's all we would eat when I was a kid. Mom would making meal for the hired men, but the rest of us in the family would just eat sweet corn only for a week straight. There are lots of people in our community that were very poor and they would come in their cars and mom would load their trunks with sweet corn. We would also go to town and sell it out of the back of the pickup. That would require us getting up very early in the morning and picking a pickup load. That was not my fondest memory.

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  7. I use the first method to eat it ~ loved me C on C! Oh, and with 2 holders, please!

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  8. I use the typewriter method, number 2 and my husband is the messier number 3! We eat corn on the cob almost every day this time of year. We also freeze it. It's tastes so good on a snowy day in January!

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  9. I use method #1. Sadly, it is very hard to find the farmers selling from their trucks in the city. I used to be able to get it from one guy who swore he picked it that morning. It was good and fresh but really? With everything built up it is hard for them to find a spot to park and sell. Maybe I should venture out into the country!

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  10. Ha ha, nu ber 2 but get still get mess of corn bits and drippy butter everywhere ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜‹๐Ÿ˜‹

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  11. I microwave my corn on the cob for 2 and a half mins per cob. Delish and easy!

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  12. We love corn on the cob here and I purchase a few ears every year since we stopped growing it in the garden. Tempted to grow some next year.

    Hard to buy from those who grow sweet corn as it is gone by the time I get to the farmers market.

    God bless.

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  13. Choose method #1. I only boil mine 2-3 minutes and then cover, turn it off, and let it set until the meal is ready. Nothing tastes like fresh corn on the cob! I have a daughter and DIL that prefer cutting it off, but I truly don't understand this method - ha, ha!

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  14. Corn on the cob is a summer must have. I am a #3 with lots of butter.

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  15. We cook ours in the microwave... About 3.15 minutes on high and still in its husk. Tastes great...siLk easy to get rid of... But only one ear at a time. No big hot pots of boiling water... But back to the good old ways when there are more than just the two of us!

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  16. Oh, I'm a #1. As a kid I used to go to town on the husk, all salty and buttery heaven on a stick, so your chickens would have despaired of me.

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  17. Well, as you know, I did a post where corn on the cob was a big part! So, yes, I love it. I'm "the whole row" (usually two or so at a time). Salt, butter, sometimes lime when I have it. I boil 5 minutes/sit 5-10. Or in the micro.

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  18. I told a young woman who worked with me to boil the corn for six to seven minutes. When I enquired about their meal I learned it was mush. Sixty seven minutes must be too long?

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  19. I like it grilled in the husk and then sliced off the cob prior to eating. Sweet corn is delicious no matter how you eat it, though!

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  20. Method number 2 for me. We often grill the corn in the husk. But our usual method is exactly like yours. We grow an early variety--Early Sunglow--and then also plant a later variety, Golden Queen if I can find the seeds. Sometimes we grow Bloody Butcher and make cornmeal, and most years grow some Indian corn just for pretty.

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  21. Lol - yup we have different corn eaters in this house too. Loads of maize gets grown in southern England for animal feed (and we guess a bit of cornmeal). F used to grow an enormous patch of sweetcorn at our allotment there too (my favorite place to sleep in the shade because she used to spread losds of dry grass along the rows to help keep moisture in the soil - shade and a soft dry bed). My humans had 100s of sweetcorns to process and freeze and even left some in a box at the gate as freebies for the neighbourhood. There are lots of modern supersweet F1 varieties that thrive in English climate.

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  22. In many parts of Suffolk the animal feed sort is grown as field edging for providing cover and some food for pheasants who are then shot between October and January!
    We use to grow the proper sort - delicious however its eaten but only good really really fresh

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  23. I do love fresh corn on the cob. Just have to find someone else to shuck it before cooking as I'm allergic to the corn silk. If I try to do it myself, it leaves me with a lovely rash all the way up to my elbows.

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  24. This is wonderful! Thanks for all the comments and also new suggestions as to how to cook it. Keep them coming. -Jenn

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  25. Wow, you can get sweet corn on the cob for a really good price! It costs an arm and a leg up here (northern Minnesota), but then the heavy forests are not corn growing country at all. Both of us are #2 eaters with salt and butter. I boil mine for 9 minutes. (Guess there are many different methods, eh?) Hubby says the old-time farm families back in Illinois would harvest and eat field corn when it was first formed and tender. Probably didn't have the flavor of sweet corn, though, I would assume. Toothpicks after the meal are a must, aren't they? :o)

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  26. I am a #1 but need to become #4 due a loose front tooth and the suggestion of my dentist. This was interesting the differences.

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  27. I eat my corn in most of those ways. I love it best on the cob, and I cook it the same way as you. Enjoy your day, hugs, Edna B.

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  28. What a fun post.
    I'm a number three but I use two Cob Knobs. (as we call them) When I finish I always declare: I need a pressure washer (for my face) and an entire package of dental floss!

    I did know there were two different types of corn and I really love cooking mine in the microwave IN the husks.

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  29. I'm definitely a fan of method 2 though without corn holders, while my son is a definite method 4. I cook mine exactly as you do and it's one of my favorite autumn meals, along with baked potatoes (from the garden), hamburger patties and for dessert, baked apples. Boy that brings back some memories!

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  30. I’m a 4, and we generally grill it in the husk. We are lucky to be able to buy it from an honor system stand at the edge of the farm, same day as it’s picked.

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  31. We certainly are a corn - eating bunch aren't we? I'm tempted to try the microwaving in the husk. I guess it steams it. Think I'll be buying some more for this weekend. Thanks again, everyone for your comments.

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  32. Wow now that is a cob of corn! We have grown corn a few times. Now that it is only me I most likely will use the garden space for other things.

    But CSUFresno has an amazing Ag Science program and a great farm store. Their COB is so good consistently over many decades it has pretty much become a annual social event in the Clovis/Fresno area.

    Lines stretch long on opening day in late May early June. They have corn up until late summer and then the faithful pretty much go into withdrawal though until next years crop comes around. My sister calls it “crack for corn junkies “!

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  33. I love good corn on the cob! Never used those holder thingys. I just pick that ear up and let the butter grease my hands. Yum. I've even been known to lick my fingers!! (grin)

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  34. OH to have proper corn on the cob! What is better than that in summer?

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