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Monday, 16 January 2017

Well, We Can Cross that One Off the List

So, on my quest to lose some weight and be a healthier, trimmer me, I looked at the produce aisle with new eyes this past weekend. I find myself in a bit of a rut sometimes, making the same suppers, or at least the same side dishes. I thought I should check out vegetables that I normally wouldn't pay attention to.

I came home with this.


It looks healthy, doesn't it? All that dark, leafy goodness..


This is what it's called. It is not actually a member of the broccoli family, but is more like a member of the turnip family, more closely related to "greens". It is called broccoli rabe because of the little heads that look like broccoli.


I didn't know how to properly prepare this lovely bunch of vitamins and minerals, so I googled it and found out that you should first blanch it in salty water to eliminate any bitterness. Then you saute it in olive oil with some garlic. Well that sounded good, so that is what I did.  It was to be my side to some garlic sausage and mashed potatoes.

We got our plates ready and sat down at the table. I was ready to embrace this glistening dark green vegetable. I already felt a little bit healthier just for having it in my house! I took my first bite... and it was horrible. I don't mean "fussy kid, I hate broccoli" horrible. No, it was bitter, "I tried to take a pill but it dissolved in my mouth before I could swallow it" horrible.

I told my husband and son not to bother to eat it, it was that bad. My husband did actually eat it and said he didn't mind it. My son took my advice and didn't even try.

I don't know why I bothered to put the unused portion of broccoli rabe / rapini back in the fridge. I won't be doing anything with the rest of it, apart from taking the pictures for my blog. I might as well just put it in the compost bin now.


30 comments:

  1. That is how I feel about Brussels sprouts. At least you tried.

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  2. Ha ha ha! Funny post. Is it still in your fridge? I feel better about throwing things once they rot.

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    1. Yes, I shall let it sit and get a bit slimy, then I will put it in the compost. ;)

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  3. That's too bad. Better luck next go.

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  4. I'll avoid that then if it hits the UK.

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  5. Another 'ha,ha' from me! Must say it looks quite nice but it obviously ain't!. I'm sure it will make great compost

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  6. If only greens tasted as good as bacon!

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  7. Maybe you should try just eating the flower part and compost the bitter leaves? Here in the UK I grow purple sprouting broccoli (PSB) which is ready to harvest February through to April. It is absolutely delicious (like asparagus which I also grow) and our favourite way to eat it is lightly steamed and served with pasta which is glistening with a paste made from garlic, chilli and anchovies sautéed until soft in olive oil and lots of Parmesan. In fact my university-age daughter loves this dish so much that she makes it all-year-round with PSB that she buys in the supermarket. For me though PSB will always be a home-grown spring-time treat.

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    1. That sounds good! Maybe your purple sprouting broccoli is more like broccoli, but this stuff is NOT broccoli. It is vile.

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  8. I have a recipe for risotto that uses broccoli rabe and red peppers and it is delicious!

    But I know a lot of people who don't like broccoli rabe - we do, but most of our friends think we're nuts. :-) I hope you have better luck next time.

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  9. One summer I planted and tended it all summer. When it was ready to eat, and a disappointing looking bunch, it was bitter and not good at all. I planted and weeded and watered this? Don't know what the big deal was about it.

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    1. Disappointing, isn't it, when you tend something in your garden and don't reap the benefits. That was me and cauliflower one year. Never planted it again.

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  10. Well, thank you! I can't stand it either---flower part or the rest of it. I think you have to have it fresh picked and tender for it to be palatable. UGH...I crossed it off my list after trying it quite a while ago. lol xo Diana

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  11. Oh- I just noticed the comments- you said you liked brussle sprouts. Have you ever tried sprinkling them with a bit of nutmeg after buttering them? Delicious!

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  12. You need some goats and sheep. They will love it! :)

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    1. We used to have a small flock of chickens. They would have enjoyed it.

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  13. Hey, Diana, know what's even better than nutmeg on brussel sprouts? Bacon!! (which of course negates the whole nutrition factor)

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  14. As a grower, it always makes me sad when people have a "bad vegetable experience"!
    I'm not a big fan of broccoli rabe, either. I honestly don't understand how the bitter greens got to be so popular. Most of the recipes I see include bacon and cheese...maybe that's to cover up the taste?
    Although, I will say that ever since I followed the advice given to me by an older woman at the Market, we haven't had any greens we didn't like. She said that her mama always said that you needed just a little sprinkle of sugar when you cooked them. (just a tiny little bit makes a tremendous difference)

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    1. My own mother was a firm believer in sugar, too!! I can see how that might counteract the bitterness. Don't know if I will cook up the rest of it and try people's suggestions or not. I'll need a back-up vegetable if it doesn't work out!

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  15. We had that same brand when I worked in a produce department. I always thought Andy Boy looked like Andy Milonakis

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  16. Oh, I know the feeling! I should be shedding those Christmas pounds but there is still a bit of left-over chocolate to eat and I can't let it go to waste! At least your vastly rabe-rapini was just one purchase. I've grown rows of veg that have promised to be really tasty as well as healthy and after one mouthful no-one has wanted to eat any of it.

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  17. I had fish and chips today at a restaurant and they served it with kale coleslaw - even rabbits won't eat raw kale. I do like Portuguese kale soup... provided the kale is cooked until it surrenders.
    the Ol'Buzzard

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  18. Oh My...I hated it too! Tried it a few years back...YUCK!!
    Funny that your Hubby like it...My boyfriend loves bok choy...not me...too bitter!! I make that for him, when I have yummy brusells which he doesn't like!
    To each his own, eh??
    Enjoy your week...
    Cheers!
    Linda :o)

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  19. Ina Garten is always cooking with this, and Martha, but I've never had it. And judging from your review, I think I'll give it a pass!

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  20. My nonna taught me to peel the stems after you trim them and before blanching to make it less bitter - worth a shot!

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  21. Well, at least you gave it a chance! Now you can say that at least you tried it. This post made me smile :)

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  22. Tooo funny! You deserve a piece of cake for trying! Have a great week.

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  23. LOL.. I love it! But the bitterness must be taken out first. Must confess, I only order it in restaurants where they did that for me.

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  24. melted cheese? How about using it in a fruit breakfast smoothie?

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