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Wednesday, 8 June 2016

Look at My Bloomers!!

Did that get your attention? But seriously folks, isn't June the best month for flowers? With the glorious heat we had on Saturday combined with the rain on Sunday, my gardens have filled in and started to burst, so with no further ado, come look at my "bloomers".

Let's start with the closest thing to heaven on earth: white peonies. I literally sink my nose in them and breath deeply. I also love how the petals are baby-skin soft.


My oriental poppies are almost all done, some of their petals hanging on by sheer determination. I love the shocking pop of colour they provide, but when they start to fade, they have all the charm of a mangy dying thistle so I usually cut them as far back as possible.



In addition to purple irises which I have already shown in an earlier post, I also have some pale yellow irises. I enjoy their large size and the combination of purple and yellow is lovely.

I am not very good at growing clematis so it always warms my heart when this Nelly Moser blooms in  a relatively neglected corner. The booms are quite large and a lovely blend of pale and medium pink.



I saw great healthy clumps of this plant at a magnificent garden  called Lark whistle on the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario. Its more common name is spiderwort. It has lovely round petals of various shades of purple, and leaves that are quite like a day lily's.


Purple Salvia is a nice upright plant. It can also be a bit of pest if it is allowed to self seed.




I love this shrub. It is a wigelia (sorry, can't remember which kind specifically, bristol tuby? Little prince?)) When we  travelled through Prince Edward Island several years ago, I took note of how so many gardens or borders contained these beautiful flowering shrubs. I've  since planted a number of them around the property.


This Statue of Aristotle moves around from garden to garden. This year he is in an East - facing bed. The white plant beside him is a miracle in itself. It is a gas plant which seriously  did not bloom for the first  five years I even dug it up and moved it to a different location. Finally it started to bloom. It is not spectacular, but I still get excited when it does bloom. Beside it, you can see a very nice cranes bill called John son's blue which I have chopped pieces out of to plant in other locations. It does start to look stragglers when the blooms fade, so it gets  a severe haircut later in the summer.  (Husband's "project car" can be seen in the background... it is supposed to be tucked out of sight... grrr)


Oh how I love this flower, so slender and elegant. Siberian irises are definitely one of my favourite flowers. I love them so much that they were in my wedding bouquet.


I've always admired lupins, but a trip to P.E.I., where these gorgeous flowers grow wild in great multi-coloured waves made me adore them even more. Unfortunately, I am not terribly successful at growing them. They last only a year or two and don't self seed well. Other people seem to grow them with very little effort.


Our old century - plus house is not formal in design or detail. The setting of our home is rural and even somewhat wild to the west of us. Rail fences suit my gardens well providing structure and definition. The fence holds taller plants up and looks rustic and pretty when plants spill over its rails.

I was raised by an annual loving mother who bought and planted flat after flat of petunias, merigolds, begonias, and alysum. She kept geraniums inside over the winter, conjuring them back to life the following spring. Although I love the consistent colour  provided by annuals, it is perennials that provide me with the most joy. I have divided and transplanted hundreds of perennials. I have schlepped grocery bags of iris roots and hunk of cranes bill to work to share with colleagues. I have even ruthlessly cut out the bullies of the plant world and encouraged the timid and gentle to establish themselves and flourish. Perhaps the best aspect of perennials is the anticipation and then the celebration of old friends coming back for a visit because they, like you, have survived another long cold Canadian winter.

15 comments:

  1. HAHA...you got me with 'bloomers'. My mind went elsewhere :)

    Your flowers are gorgeous! June is definitely the best month for 'bloomers' :)

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  2. Your "bloomers" are indeed eye-catching. ;)
    You certainly have a lot of color in your garden! Lovely!

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    1. Thank you Barbara. I have vegetable garden envy when I read your blog.

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  3. I( have packets of hardy annuals waiting to go in this year, but we need rain first as everywhere is so dry.

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    1. The only things I start from seed (on purpose) are vegetables. I hope you get some rain!

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  4. That's a nice garden. I like my blue salvia too. I've started removing some of my cranesbill because it's getting a bit pushy.

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    1. Yes, I have cranesbill that really spreads all over the place. Johnson's blue has much better manners, though.

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  5. Gorgeous photos. I love that Aristotle moves around the gardens. You are too funny about hubby's car (grrr). Have a good weekend.

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    1. Thanks, Katie. You have a good weekend, as well.

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  6. I must say I think your bloomers are beautiful!

    I am so sadly lacking in my knowledge of perennials. Sigh. I keep saying I am going to educate myself and start collecting and planting them. What's better than a plant that comes back year after year with just a small amount of TLC?

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    1. What you may lack in knowledge about perennials, you sure make up for with your other gardens, Mama Pea!

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  7. Jenn, I love that you move the statue around your gardens. I love how pretty it is there. Peonies are so pretty...but the wind and rain can take them down so quickly. I too love perennials the best. I have shared my mums with my oldest daughter this year. I hope they do well for her. Blessings, xoxo, Susie

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  8. Isn't that funny, Susie. Mums are another plant that I don't grow very well! Yes, the peonies suffer with heavy rain, that's why I get out there and stick my nose in them as frequently as possible before they dissolve in a messy slop of petals!

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  9. What beautiful gardens!!!!!!! You have done an amazing job, nurturing and tweeking and making so many "bloomers" so happy, there.

    Ahhh, your husband has a "project" car. My husband would love to "come over" and help him! ,-) My husband has a 1950 Chevy truck, and a 1930 Model A car with a rumble seat. And he is always doing something, with the truck. :-))))

    Again, you have a green thumb!

    Gentle hugs,
    Tessa

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